Regulations, Certifications and Raytac’s Modules – What do we make more convenient for our customers?

Raytac’s pre-certified module for your convenience – but how?So, in this post, we would like to take you on a little journey through most of the important certifications that Raytac has pre-certified their modules with.
The exact topic is actually what you need to know and what that means to you as a Raytac customer.

Obviously, each and every certification has their own rules, so that’s how we’re going to do this – one by one.

  1. FCC – (U.S.A.)

Most people in the industry have heard of FCC, but for you who really don’t know what it is, it’s the Federal Communications Commission in the United States of America. Although considered as a center for these regulations, you will soon realize that they’re not really the center of these regulations and laws at all.
So for the FCC certification, you can as a Raytac customer:

    1. Use Raytac’s certification ID directly on your finished product’s label

But you need to:

  1. Test FCC Part 15B EMC for your finished products
  1. IC – (Canada)

When it comes to the Industry Canada (yes, that’s what IC stands for), the regulations and procedures are much like their sibling FCC.

    1. Use Raytac’s certification ID on your finished product’s label (same as FCC)

But, just like FCC, you need to:

  1. Test IC ES003 (EMC)
    • This can be combined together with the FCC Part 15B test
  1. TELEC – (Japan)

TELEC, sometimes referred to as MIC, is surprisingly simple.
What you will need to do is:

  1. Use Raytac’s certification ID on your finished product’s label

Yes – you can actually just go right ahead and implement and/or commercialize your product after its parts are all proven TELEC certified which is pretty neat. However, there is another test that you as a customer can do if you wish, and that is VCCI which is just like the EMC tests mentioned above with the only difference (in terms of regulation) is that it’s NOT mandatory. Thus, you can choose not to do it as well.

  1. KC – (South Korea)

As for the Korean regulation, these are the things you will have to do:

  1. Test EMC for wireless (KN301489 – same as CE’s EN301489)
  2. Test EMC for wire (IO port) (KN3235)
    • If, and only if, your final product is equipped with IO ports, that is.

These two tests needs to be done locally (Korean test lab) and depending on which test it is, you’ll have to deal with them differently.
Firstly, for the wireless test, you can refer to Raytac’s own certification report so that the lab knows the module itself has passed although it still needs to be tested.
Secondly, the for wire (IO port) test, you will have to do from scratch essentially.
Thus, even though we have applied for KC for our modules, you will still have to test them locally.

  1. CE (Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (RED)) – (EEA, Europe)

Although CE is considered as strict regulation, the procedure is pretty simple. Simply put, you will have to conduct tests on a few different samples, and the procedure goes:

  1. Test on Conducted engineering sample (EN300328)
    • You can refer to Raytac’s test report, if the test lab accepts it, that is.
      To ensure that they do, you can choose to conduct your tests at the same lab as Raytac – SGS.
  2. Test on Radiated engineering sample (EN300328)
  3. Test EMC (EN301489)
  4. Test Safety (EN60950)
    • Subject to change to EN62368 in 2021
  1. SRRC

Simply put, you will have 2 scenarios:

  1. Your end product can either be defined as a “Home Appliances” or an “Office Utilities” product
    • Then you can simply refer Raytac’s SRRC ID (module policy just like FCC/IC/TELEC)
  2. Your end product is neither of the above
    • You have to apply for your own SRRC ID by testing everything required by the regulation
  1. NCC

They go by a “Platform policy” which basically means that as long as you are just adding functionality onto an already existing feature, then you can leverage Raytac’s NCC ID on your product’s label directly (module policy just like FCC/IC/TELEC/SRRC). Otherwise, you will have to apply for a new one.
Thus, the procedure becomes:

  1. Adding functionality of an already existing feature (a.k.a. platform)?
    • Then you can simply refer Raytac’s NCC ID on your product (module policy just like FCC/IC/TELEC/SRRC)
  2. New ideas/features?
    • Sorry, you have to apply for your own NCC ID by conducting all tests necessary
  1. RCM

Australia’s RCM (Regulatory Compliance Mark) is a lot like CE, much like IC is similar to FCC.
When applying to this certification, you will be in either of these two circumstances:

  1. CE already done.
    • You can refer to your own CE certification and ask your test lab to copy the report to your RCM application.
  2. CE NOT done.
    • You must conduct the test from scratch. But it is a whole lot like CE, meaning:
    • Test on Conducted engineering sample
    • Test on Radiated engineering sample
    • Test EMC
    • Test Safety
  1. Bluetooth Certification

Last, but definitely not least, is the Bluetooth Certification. For this one, choosing Raytac’s modules will bring you great benefits. But first, you need to:

  1. Apply for Bluetooth SIG’s “Adopter Membership” (free)
    • You can apply for the membership here
  2. Purchase your DID
  3. Leverage Raytac’s QDID
    • To activate your newly purchased DID

For your first product, that is all you will have to do. But what if you come up with a new model of the product? Before you ask, I will answer “No – you don’t necessarily have to purchase another DID.” In order for this to be true though, your new product cannot have either of these things changed:

  1. Hardware
    • Unless you are still using Raytac’s module
  2. Feature
    • Unless you are still using Raytac’s module
  3. Brand Name
    • Brand name remains unchanged.

Although you might be able to apply for these certifications all on your own without trouble whatsoever, we always encourage customers using Raytac’s BLE modules to contact us before hand so that we can provide you valuable information. This way, you will get unbiased guidance which will save you time and money.

As always – Happy tinkering everybody 🙂

Raytac Corporation 勁達國際電子有限公司 A BT 5.1 & BT 5 & BT 4.2 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution (nRF52840 & nRF52832 & nRF52811 & nRF52810 & nRF51822)

www.raytac.com email: cs@raytac.com Tel: +886.2.3234.0208

nRF52840 v.2 – What’s New?

From IC Revision 1 to 2While there are quite a few changes available for review in the nRF52840 documentation, there is update that is particularly important for many users out there, including a large amount of our own customers. The update I am talking about is about the power supply.

First things first – if you’re interested in reading the whole documentation for Nordic Semiconductor’s nRF52840, then look no further than their Infocenter.
nRF52840 IC reversions and variants

As you can see in the picture below, there’s a lot of information about LDO and DC/DC regulators. That is exactly the main topic of today’s post.
On nRF52840 version C, when changing from 5.5V to 3.3V, you had to use LDO mode in order for the chip to function properly. In the new chip version 2, you won’t have to change to LDO mode as you can directly use REG0 DC to DC.

I will let the Infocenter documentation speak for how it works in detail as quoted below:
Nordic Infocenter - nRF52840 Power Supply update.PNG

The system contains two main supply regulator stages, REG0 and REG1.

Each regulator stage has the following regulator type options:

Low-dropout regulator (LDO)
Buck regulator (DC/DC)
In normal voltage mode, only the REG1 regulator stage is used and the REG0 stage is automatically disabled. In high voltage mode, both regulator stages (REG0 and REG1) are used. The output voltage of REG0 can be configured in register REGOUT0. This output voltage is connected to VDD and is the input voltage to REG1.

By default, the LDO regulators are enabled and the DC/DC regulators are disabled. Registers DCDCEN0 and DCDCEN are used to independently enable the DC/DC regulators for the two stages (REG0 and REG1 respectively).

When a DC/DC converter is enabled, the LDO for the corresponding regulator stage will be disabled. External LC filters must be connected for each of the DC/DC regulators being used. The advantage of using a DC/DC regulator is that the overall power consumption is normally reduced as the efficiency of such a regulator is higher than that of a LDO. The efficiency benefit of using a DC/DC regulator becomes particularly prominent when the regulator voltage drop (difference between input and output voltage) is high. The efficiency of internal regulators vary with the supply voltage and the current drawn from the regulators.

Note: Do not enable DC/DC regulator without an external LC filter being connected as this will inhibit device operation, including debug access, until an LC filter is connected.

We hope you get a better understanding about the update from nRF52840 Revision 1 to 2 and its power supply.

Raytac now has started supply module demo board, MDBT50Q-DB, build by nRF52840 v2 SoC.

If you would like to purchase our MDBT50Q-DB demo board (deployed module: MDBT50Q-1MV2) on it, you can get one on eBay or Verical.

We at Raytac wish you all a nice day and happy tinkering 🙂

 

Raytac Corporation 勁達國際電子有限公司 A BT 5.1 & BT 5 & BT 4.2 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution (nRF52840 & nRF52832 & nRF52811 & nRF52810 & nRF51822)

www.raytac.com email: cs@raytac.com Tel: +886.2.3234.0208

Raytac’s UART Service (AT Command) – How do you get started?

Easy! At least when you know what to doMany of our customers just want a device that provides Bluetooth technology to their product or solution that they’ve developed. However, utilizing the full capacity of the Bluetooth protocol is not always easy and sometimes not even necessary. For these customers, choosing Raytac’s modules/dongles loaded with AT Command, such as MDBT50Q-RX-ATM, is the best choice.
But even a product such as MDBT50Q-RX-ATM that is supposed to make it easy for customers to wirelessly transfer data from one device to the next can be difficult to use – especially when you don’t know HOW.

So, I thought we’d take this in two simple steps.

  1. Device Name

To be really sure that you can connect to the device thus making you able to pair with it, you will have to make sure that the device name setting in the AT Command list is set to the name you want or need.
For example, if you have a device set to have the name “I_love_Bluetooth” and you haven’t changed the settings in the AT Command, you will not be able to pair your MDBT50Q-RX-ATM with this device.
As you can see in the picture below, the default setting for this device’s name is “Raytac AT-UART”.

When editing this name, you get a smaller window like this popping up:

Make sure that the name set on your device that you wish to connect with the dongle AND this name in the AT-Command device’s list are the same.

  1. RSSI

This is a trickier part – especially when you don’t know what it is.
RSSI stands for Received Signal Strength Indicator and, just like the name implies, is a value of strength of which the incoming signal has to be in order to even be considered by the scanning device.
In other words, the lower the value is set to, the weaker signals the scanning device will show.
The standard value of Raytac’s AT-Command modules/dongle is -51 and the setting screen looks like this:

  1. Slave device’s SDK

What many new customers seem to believe is that if you use our AT-Command modules/dongles, you won’t need to do anything – they will just magically communicate with each other somehow.
I hate to break it to you, but no… that’s not how it works. You will have to at least make sure that the two devices “speak the same language”. As for our AT-Command modules/dongles, or in this case MDBT50Q-RX-ATM, it is through a “language” (a.k.a. protocol) called UART.
First of all, “UART” is not “U-ART” although it’s kind of pronounced that way, but it’s an abbreviation that stands for Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter. You can read about it here.
I will spare you all the details about the UART protocol itself, but one thing that we will need to make sure of is that you have it installed onto your slave device.

Hopefully, you’ve downloaded Nordic’s latest SDK and you have it ready on your computer. You can download them directly HERE.
Note: This file is quite big (~130MB), so DO NOT click on the last link if you don’t want to download this on your current device.

Inside this file, you will find a lot of stuff. However, for this particular case, we only really need to care about the “examples” folder.

In this folder, we will have (surprise surprise!) even more folders 😀
As per usual, we don’t have to check them all out. In this case, we specifically only want to check the “ble_peripheral” and the “peripheral” folders.

Go into the former folder and you’ll find see the following folders in which you will want to enter the “ble_app_uart” folder.:

In this folder, you will see five more folders and two files, but we only want to check out one of them depending on which chip type you’re using in your slave device. Let’s say you’re using a nRF52832 chip (or module such as MDBT42Q-P512KV2), then you’d want to enter the first folder called pca10040. Check the picture below to see which folder you’d want to enter:

Assuming you entered the folder that I mentioned above, you will then want to enter the “s132” folder.

Once you’re in here, I am pretty sure you developers out there know what to pick 🙂

In the beginning of this section, however, I also mentioned another folder called “peripheral” which we will guide you through now – even if it’s very similar to what we just did.

As you can see, there are a TON of folders in here, but we will cherry-pick our folders here too.
Let’s say that you’d like to be able to make your slave device to read and transmit information from a sensor. Supposedly, most sensors use either the I2C or the SPI interface. In each respective folder, you will find the same folder layout as in the previous picture – folders representing what chip/module you have.
The main point of showing you this is simply because from these two folders, you can snatch the small amount of code that you need to edit the main code of your UART main-code so that you can both read and send the data from the sensor you might have.

Hopefully, you’ve now started to realize how these things come together and we can finally start to connect these devices. This takes us to the next step:

  1. ATSCANNEW

Once that’s done, you will need to use your AT-Command module/dongle (here MDBT50Q-RX-ATM) to scan for the slave device that you want to pair. To do this, you first have to make sure your slave device is broadcasting, then execute a command called ATSCANNEW.
Once you’ve done so, your MDBT50Q-RX-ATM’s blue LED will hopefully go from fast blinking to a slower blinking. This means that your two devices, master and slave, have now paired successfully. Wohoo! 🙂

We hope that this makes our AT-Command modules/dongles even easier to use!
Raytac wishes you all happy tinkering 🙂

Raytac Corporation 勁達國際電子有限公司 A BT 5.1 & BT 5 & BT 4.2 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution (nRF52840 & nRF52832 & nRF52811 & nRF52810 & nRF51822)

www.raytac.com email: cs@raytac.com Tel: +886.2.3234.0208

LINE’s IoT platform “LINE Things”

LINE introduced an IoT platform “LINE Things” allows Bluetooth Low Energy  (BLE) devices integrated to LINE’s ecosystem through LINE Things and operate by LINE’s own developed LINE Front-end Framework (LIFF) application.

Line Things Framework

To introduce this edge cutting service network, LINE Things provides various development kits help developers easy reaching out the real scenario. The kit uses Raytac MDBT42Q-512KV2 module deployed Nordic nF52832 solution to built a completed LINE Things demo board, circuit diagram, hardware design reference, and even source code available published in GitHub.  At the mean time, LINE also proposed a LINE Things Developer Trial Program in progress.

neopixel.jpg

LINE, as one of the most popular instance messaging service provider in the world, now has brought the connection evolution from individual communication to social community. Raytac encourages developers to explore the LINE Things by visiting the hyper link provide in the article or direct contact LINE to understand more about the benefit which may tremendous change crowd’s life in the near future.

Developers who are interested in Line Things may visit below link for registration
https://feedback.line.me/enquete/public/3545-3I7tVA5i

Message can use Chinese, English and Japanese, LINE Things staff in each country will respond.

Raytac Corporation 勁達國際電子有限公司
A BT5 & BT 4.2 & BTv4.1 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution
(nRF52840 & nRF52832 & nRF52810 & & nRF52811 &nRF51822)
www.raytac.com email: cs@raytac.com Tel: +886.2.3234.0208

Burn your firmware – onto MDBT50Q-RX that is

Hi there, folks!
So you have hopefully downloaded your IDE, you have written your code which you then plan to copy it over onto your MDBT50Q-RX and make it execute your master plan to take over the world!
Seriously, don’t underestimate the Nordic nRF52840 based MDBT50Q-RX. USB sticks with Bluetooth can do wonders 😉
(I am serious! Just look at Plezmo! You see that USB stick? Yep, that’s another Raytac for ya)So, first of all, in order to be able to burn your code onto the USB Dongle, you will have to know the nerdy parts which includes which pins you will have to connect to. In our very well documented specification sheet for MDBT50Q-RX on section 8 which is called “Reference Circuit”, you will find parts down to the left that has “3.3V/SWDIO/SWCLK/GND” marks on it:
Burning pins on MDBT50Q-RXFurther down in the specification sheet, in section 9, you will find pictures illustrating where exactly on the PCB you can find these pins:
Pin locations

Now we know what to look for and where they are, so now we have only got to tell you how to use them.

Some people might not know this, but for developing these things, you need to get something called J-Link to connect your MDBT50Q-RX to your desktop. However, since this J-Link, when buying the official one from SEGGER, is very expensive, we strongly recommend you to just buy the nRF52840-DK from Nordic Semiconductor as it can be used as a J-Link through their software development kit (SDK) called nRFgo Studio and is MUCH CHEAPER than the official J-Link from SEGGER is.
Sidenote: There are a couple of other reasons why you should just get your hands on a nRF52840-DK from Nordic Semiconductor instead of getting a SEGGER J-Link, but that’s not the topic of this post 😉

When this is done, this is finally how you connect your MDBT50Q-RX to your J-Link to make it all work:

MDBT50Q-RX and J-Link connection

Here you will have to pay attention to the fact that you have to connect J-Link pins 3, 5 & 9 to GND. Otherwise, you won’t be able to burn anything onto your dear MDBT50Q-RX.
The physical connection should look like this:

J-Link Cable Connection

Pay attention to the direction of the cable, because that will also matter. The direction we mean in this case is which way the slim strip of red is facing.

As we have just revised our MDBT50Q-RX, our customers who have been developing firmware for our USB dongle should take a look at our previous blog post in which we explain about the changes made or contact us directly at service@raytac.com

Have a good day and we at Raytac wish you smooth and happy tinkering 🙂

Raytac Corporation 勁達國際電子有限公司
A BT5 & BT 4.2 & BTv4.1 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution
(nRF51822 & nRF51422 & nRF52832 & nRF52810 & nRF52840)
www.raytac.com email: cs@raytac.com Tel: +886.2.3234.0208

 

Raytac Corporation at IT Week Hall 3 & 4 / 11-22

With over 600 exhibitors gathering in Tokyo, Japan from April 10-12, IT Week has become one of the biggest exhibitions within the IoT Technology sector.
Raytac is pleased to be attending this years IT Week and present our full range of module family based on Nordic nRF51822, nRF52832 and nRF52840.

Meanwhile, the latest product, MDBT50Q-RX, a multi protocol nRF52840 dongle will make its second public appearance which powers up the most advanced IoT and Mesh network implementations.

Raytac Corporation 勁達國際電子有限公司
A BT5 & BT 4.2 & BTv4.1 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution (nRF51822 & nRF51422 & nRF52832 & nRF52810 & nRF52840)

Raytac nRF52840 BT5 Module MDBT50Q Series WPC (India) Certification Granted

Raytac would like to announce MDBT50Q series Bluetooth Module which deployed Nordic nRF52840 solution have WPC (India) certificate granted.

We believed it will help Indian customers breakthrough to Bluetooth world with Raytac WPC certified nRF52840 modules.

Raytac nRF52840 BLE Module SeriesRaytac nRF52840 BLE Module Series
bluetooth_ANT_thread_zigbee_logo_v2-180918
Raytac Corporation
A BT4.1 & BT4.2 & BT5 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution 
(nRF51822 & nRF51422 & nRF52832 & nR52810 & nRF52840)
www.raytac.com          email: cs@raytac.com          Tel: +886.2.3234.0208

Nordic nRF52832 & nRF52840 Module Solution

After Nordic released nRF52840, the confusion raised what the difference between nRF52832. Raytac provided an easy comparison chart based on module solution hopes to provide a quick understanding in between.

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Visit Raytac in Global Sources 2018 Fall Exhibition, Hong Kong

With over 3,800 exhibitors gathering in Hong Kong, Global Sources has become one of  the largest specialized sourcing trade fair around electronics.

Raytac's Exhibition

We are excited to announce that Raytac will be in attendance over there to present our latest products: 

1. Nordic nRF52840 Solution Module: MDBT50Q Series

2. Nordic nRF52810 Solution AT Command Module

3. Nordic nRF52832 Solution AT Command Module

4. Osram Laser Solution: Ultra Low Power Direct Green Laser Module

5. Bluetooth Application

Raytac Exhibition.jpg

To know more about Raytac, why not come over to have a chat!

Looking forward to seeing you in Hong Kong!

Raytac Corporation

bluetooth_ANT_thread_zigbee_logo
A member of SIG and Thread Group

Raytac Corporation
A BT4.1 & BT4.2 & BT5 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution 
(nRF51822 & nRF51422 & nRF52832 & nR52810 & nRF52840)
www.raytac.com          email: cs@raytac.com          Tel: +886.2.3234.0208

Raytac nRF52840 Module MDBT50Q FCC ID Granted

Raytac’s EE policy (Easy Employee) core is to provide the pre-certified modules.

Benefits from this policy, products built by Raytac’s module may save or reduce the procedure in certification application process which successfully improved Time To Market efficiency and Cost Effective for all customers.

Raytac’s latest module, MDBT50Q series module employed Nordic nRF52840 solution has developed 3 lines with different antenna type.

MDBT50Q-1M: Chip Antenna

MDBT50Q-P1M: PCB Antenna

MDBT50Q-U1M: u.FL connector with external Antenna.

We are glad to announce that MDBT50Q series modules have FCC Part 15 C Regulation Certificated granted with FCC ID: SH6MDBT50Q.

FCC Category: Portable Device

Product Name: Bluetooth Low Energy & IEEE802.15.4 Combo Module

Certified Protocol : BT5 & IEEE 802.15.4

Bluetooth-side

Certification Detail

Nordic nRF52840 MDBT50Q FCC Certificate
Nordic nRF52840 Module By Raytac MDBT50Q FCC Certification

Certification Item

MDBT50Q-1M (Chip Antenna Version)

MDBT50Q-P1M (PCB Antenna Version)

MDBT50Q-U1M (External Antenna Version, Listed in below)

MDBT50U Antenna Detail

Raytac Corporation
A BT4.1 & BT4.2 & BT5 module maker based on Nordic nRF51 & nRF52 solution 
(nRF51822 & nRF51422 & nRF52832 & nR52810 & nRF52840)
www.raytac.com          email: cs@raytac.com          Tel: +886.2.3234.0208